13 April 2017

Lemon & Dill Baked Tilapia

I'm down to cooking one supper for the two of us during the work week, because -- between my new job, gym, yoga, poker, and other important things -- our weekday schedules don't overlap at suppertime. And when I am around to cook, I find I want to make something fast, easy, and mindless.


Essentially, we eat a lot of variations on this dish. It works with pretty much any white fish as well as salmon and the fresh dill can easily be replaced with equivalent amounts of dry herbs or seasoning blends. The only things that are consistent from version to version are oven temperature, lemon, olive oil, and garlic.


Lemon & Dill Tilapia

Yield: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 tilapia fillets
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 Tbsp minced fresh dill
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400°F.
  • Brush a baking dish with a little olive oil or spritz with cooking spray.
  • Blot fillets dry with a paper towel and arrange fillets in dish.
  • Mix remaining ingredients in a bowl and spread over fillets.
  • Bake fillets uncovered for 15-20 minutes or until fish flakes easily and has reached 145°F.



12 April 2017

Wordless Wednesday: Perky Purple Pansies

"I send thee pansies while the year is young,
Yellow as sunshine, purple as the night."
~ Sarah Dowdney, Pansies

11 April 2017

Favorite Poems & Poets: Judy Grahn

I discovered Judy Grahn waaaay back when I was a 90s-era college freshman, lurking in the library stacks, looking for something I couldn't begin to articulate. Like many people of that age and time, I was full of unfamiliar stirrings and oh-so-many FEELS but had no cultural, religious, or emotional frame to hang them on.


I was a bookish girl, you know. All my life, whenever I couldn't find the words to explain the world, books were there to help me. And I quite legitimately expected books would help me with the Big Queer Feels.

So I stumbled my way through reams of poetry and feminist essays until I found a version of myself and the world that felt "true." And Judy Grahn was a big part of that. First with her Another Mother Tongue and then, later, with her poetry.

In hindsight, it is clear I sometimes had no real understanding of what I read, but the words she chose ... the righteous tone of her arguments ... made me feel like I was part of something magnificent. That my feelings had a natural place in the universe and that the universe was not the narrow construct I feared it was.

So here's Ani Difranco (also a huge part of my coming to terms with all the Big Queer Feels) reading Grahn's "Detroit Annie, Hitchhiking" from The Work of a Common Woman. Happy National fucking Poetry Month, people.