Lynn Gardner: Baba Ghanoush


9.21.2017

Baba Ghanoush

Last week, I brought home two beautiful inky-purple eggplants from the CSA. I usually avoid cooking eggplant, because I don't have much experience with it and find it intimidating. But part of the point of joining a CSA was to experience new fruits and vegetables and extend out the borders of my culinary comfort zone. And, thus, eggplant in my kitchen.

Way back in the stone age, we'd served baba ghanoush at our wedding reception and, while I hadn't eaten it since, I remember really liking it. But now I had two eggplants -- which meant I had one backup eggplant if the first batch was terrible -- so why not try to make my own baba ghanoush? I looked at a few recipes and decided to go with Betty Crocker's "Baba Ghanoush" as it was very straight forward and used ingredients I already had on hand.

Basically, you roast eggplant and chickpeas in the oven until the chickpeas are shrunken and golden and the eggplant is worryingly charred. The chickpeas will cook faster than the eggplant, so even though you're using a timer, it's good to check on them regularly.


Once the eggplant has cooled enough to handle, you'll scoop the flesh from the eggplant and whiz it around in your food processor with the chickpeas, lemon juice, garlic (I doubled the amount of garlic), black pepper, and tahini. The flesh of the eggplant may look rather unappetizing, but it will all turn out yummy.


Sprinkle the baba ghanoush with smoked paprika and serve. Pita chips are a very traditional accompaniment but I ate mine with pretzel squares, because that's what was in the cupboard. The recipe says it serves eight, but I'd say six is more likely.


Admittedly, I don't have much experience with the stuff, but I thought this recipe made really good baba ghanoush. It's creamy, garlicky, and slightly tangy-sweet. Definitely very moreish.

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