Stuff and Nonsense: CliCK Willimantic: Beeswax Wraps


3.07.2020

CliCK Willimantic: Beeswax Wraps

Beeswax wraps are all the rage at farmers markets and craft shows near me. Made of cotton, beeswax, jojoba oil, and pine resin these wraps are an all-natural, washable, reusable, and compostable alternative to plastic wrap and baggies. They're great for wrapping sandwiches, snacks, cheese, fruits, and vegetables. You can also use them to cover a bowl or casserole.

You shouldn't wrap raw meat in a beeswax wrap and expect to be able to use the wrap again -- they're not airtight and can't be cleaned the way you're meant to clean a meat container. You also probably don't want to use it to cover a bowl of something sloshy, like soup or sauce, as the wrap will grip, but not seal.

Anywho, 14th on my 43 in 43 list is to use less plastic. Beeswax wraps seemed like an answer to the plastic wrap and baggie problem, but the idea of purchasing such a basic product bothered me. I possessed a box of cute, high-quality cottons and knew Amazon could supply me with beeswax, pine resin, and jojoba oil. Surely, I could make my own beeswax wraps.


For months I thought about making wraps, but didn't act on the idea until I saw CLiCK Willimantic was offering a DIY class is their teaching kitchen. CLiCK is part local processing facility for small farms and business, part education center, and part community garden. It hosts ServSafe certification classes as well as classes for more domestic types -- jams, pickling, vermicomposting, and the afore-mentioned beeswax wraps.

Last weekend, nine or so of us learned to gently melt the wax, resin, and oil together over a double boiler, then brush it onto our fabric squares and pop it in a low oven for 3 minutes. Once the fabric looked evenly shiny and saturated, we hung them up to "dry" for a few minutes. And that was it, the whole shebang. Nine complete beginners made two wraps each in an hour.

While I clearly applied too much wax to my wraps, I'm still quite proud of them and have already put them to use. If I were ready to make more wraps now, I would place the CLiCK wraps in the oven until they warmed up and then lay them on unwaxed fabric to blot up some of the excess wax mixture.


CLiCK is part local processing facility for small farms and business, part education center, and part community garden. It hosts ServSafe certification classes as well as classes for home gardeners -- jams, pickling, vermicomposting, and the afore-mentioned beeswax wraps.