Stuff and Nonsense: gardening


Showing posts with label gardening. Show all posts
Showing posts with label gardening. Show all posts

8.21.2019

#WordlessWednesday: Cosmos bipinnatus

White cosmos blooming in the dill and fennel bed.
Like those two herbs, cosmos also attract pollinators.

7.31.2019

7.17.2019

#WordlessWednesday: Coreopsis

Happy yellow Tickseed (Coreopsis) blooming in the afternoon shade.

7.10.2019

#WordlessWednesday: Rudbeckia hirta

Always cheerful black-eyed Susan, a low-care plant
beneficial to bees, butterflies, and birds

6.26.2019

6.19.2019

5.22.2019

#WordlessWednesday: Calibrachoa

I just love the color looks dabbed on, as if by a tiny sponge.

5.15.2019

#WordlessWednesday: Yellow Iris

If bumblebees were irises, they might look like this?

5.01.2019

4.24.2019

#Wordless Wednesday: Bluets

Small and delicate-looking bluets (Houstonia caerulea) in bloom among moss & stone.

4.10.2019

#WordlessWednesday: Crocus Chrysanthus 'Dorothy'

Happy yellow Crocus chrysanthus 'Dorothy' getting ready to bloom any day now.

4.03.2019

10.03.2018

Wordless Wednesday: Sage

Love the soft, velvety texture of sage leaves.

9.09.2018

Sunday in the Garden

I planted a wee pot of pineapple sage by the hummingbird feeder in late May as I'd heard its flowers were attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies. Well, for the longest time the plant did nothing. Threw out the occasional red blossom, yes, but otherwise just sat there, looking gangly and unloved. I guess it was gathering energy, because the pineapple sage experienced a huge burst of growth in late July and now, in September, has completely taken over a third of the raised bed. The spiky red flowers are quite plentiful and the hummingbirds have been skipping right over the feeder to get to the flowers.


In Connecticut, pineapple sage is best treated as an annual but I am going to heavily mulch the crown when the foliage dies back and hope the plant will come back on its own. Otherwise, its back to Agway next spring for a new one!


That's a 48-inch black steel shepherd hook the hummingbird feeder is hanging off and the vegetable bed is about 18 inches deep, making the pineapple sage around 2½ feet tall!

9.05.2018

8.08.2018

7.25.2018

Wordless Wednesday: Tomato Season

The cherry tomatoes are beginning to ripen! Hooray, for delicious red orbs.

7.22.2018

Sunday (Not) in the Garden

It rained most of today so I didn't get out in the garden as planned. Yesterday, I pulled the snap peas as they had just about reached their end and I needed a spot to relocate the utterly unhappy chard. Things have not going well at all for the chard, trapped as they have been in the sprawl of Brussels sprouts. This is my first year growing sprouts and I was not sure what to expect so I did not allocate enough space for them and they've taken over, nearly smothering the chard. They are at least growing the way they're supposed to, I think, and mini cabbages are slowly forming along the stalks.


Anyway, the chard have been dug up, replanted, fertilized, and watered. Hopefully all will go well with them from now on and I will soon be inundated with chard ... but not too soon as it's begun to appear in my weekly CSA share and there's a definite limit to just how much chard I can cope with before I make some regrettable smoothies. The limit is two. Two bunches in one week. More than that and I get a little chard crazy.

The cucumbers are in fine fiddle and are, I think, trying to put me to shame. Or actively going to war against me. "Oh, you human, you poopooed us. Dismissed us as weak and doomed to fail and yet here we are burying you in the fruits of our vines." At the moment, my crisper drawer is 70% cucumber and I have resorted to making pitchers of posh cucumber-lemon spa water.

Speaking of things I can't keep a handle on, the basil have bolted and are covered in beautiful white flowers. I feel I should be a bit cross with myself for not reining them in when I could, but they look so lovely in bloom and the bees love it. Who am I to thwart the happiness of bees?


7.15.2018

Sunday in the Garden

This week the flower garden is looking particularly good. Flowers are blooming all through the garden, and the colors are charming. Below is a picture of one of my favorite, Geranium "Rozanne," which I have planted in large swaths along the front of the house. Rozanne blooms unflaggingly June through September, always spreading but never sprawling, and just about the time the flowers stop in the fall, the leaves tint a lovely bronzy red. Also, pollinators love it.


Speaking of plants pollinators love, the butterfly weed is also doing well this summer. My mother gave me an envelope of dried butterfly weed seed pods a few years ago and I scattered the seeds in the narrow strip of soil between the garage and the front path lat that fall, not really expecting much, but figuring it couldn't do any harm. Every spring since, a plant has sprung up ... only to succumb to a terrible aphid infestation. Except this year. This year, everything is good. I am suspicious of my luck and have my spray bottle of insecticidal soap on hand, just in case.


Many of the drumstick allium I planted in 2014 have somehow migrated to the opposite end of the garden (I blame ambitious, excavating chipmunks), but are doing so well in their new home I am not inclined to move them back. Also, I am lazy.

I'm not overly keen on ornamental alliums, but drumstick alliums with their egg-shaped green and burgundy umbels are simply fetching. Mine are just on the edge of blooming, but will still be handsome even when overblown and blowsy from the the August sun.